Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017

Banding together

OSU helps analyze hurricane floodwater contaminants

Kim Anderson, an environmental chemist at OSU's College of Agricultural Sciences, wears a chemical-detecting silicone wristband in this 2014 photo.

Capital Press

KHOU Houston

Oregon State University is teaming up with researchers on a project to monitor chemical exposure from Hurricane Harvey floodwater using specialized wristbands. The wristbands can detect volatile and semi-volatile chemicals directly from water and air. Oregon State scientists recently distributed nearly 200 wristbands to Houston residents recovering from floods. After one week, study participants will send them back to be analyzed.

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The West's wildfires are taking a toll on reservoirs

Water Deeply

New research predicts that an increase in the frequency and magnitude of wildfires will double the rates of sedimentation in one-third of the West's large watersheds, reducing reservoir storage and affecting water supplies. According to a new study from the U.S. Geological Survey, in many regions erosion rates are accelerating because of wildfires and climate change.

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Northwest drought retreats; outlook turns wetter

Capital Press

Oregon and Washington’s flash droughts are receding, and La Nina is shaping up in the Pacific Ocean, causing long-range forecasts to turn wetter and cooler, federal climatologists reported. Some 64 percent of Washington is in a drought, down from 78 percent the week before, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. Oregon’s drought retreated to 28 percent of the state, down from 43 percent.

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