Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017

On the right track

State says most Minn. farms will meet buffer deadline

Sections of unnamed channel of Whiskey Creek on a farm near Rothsay, Minn., have been widened and rebuilt to provide a better buffer between adjacent farmland and the water. ANN ARBOR MILLER

MPR News

MPR News

Most Minnesota farmers are complying with the first phase of a law designed to protect water from pollution. Passed two years ago, the law requires a vegetative buffer, usually grass, between farmland and public waters such as streams, lakes and wetlands. The deadline to have the buffers installed is Nov. 1. State agriculture officials say with just a few weeks left buffers are in place on 94 percent of the land requiring the protective strips.

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Feds, farmers team up to fight algae blooms

Great Lakes Echo

Federal officials are launching a two-year study to determine the best ways to convince farmers to help fight water pollution in the Great Lakes region. Interest from farmers is substantial, said Brian Buehler, the Michigan Natural Resources Conservation Service public affairs specialist, but they often need help bearing the financial burden of implementing sustainable farming practices.

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Researchers look to harness virus to fight carp

Minnesota Daily

University of Minnesota researchers see a recent fish virus outbreak as a chance to combat an invasive species plaguing state lakes. Researchers at the University’s Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center in St. Paul have been studying the usage of Koi herpesvirus — responsible for recent carp deaths in Minnesota lakes — for potential bio-control of invasive carp.

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