Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015

Signs of progress

Michigan makes strides in toxic Lake Erie algae battle

Non-harmful duckweed covers a drain at Secord Farms in Monroe on Sept. 29, 2015. New data indicates that harmful algal bloom-fueling phosphorus in the River Raisin, a Lake Erie tributary, has been reduced by nearly 50 percent in the past seven years, a drop that state officials are attributing to conservation farming practices. GARRET ELLISON

MLive.com

MLive.com

New data indicates that harmful algal bloom-fueling phosphorus in a Lake Erie tributary has been reduced by nearly 50 percent in the past seven years, a drop Michigan officials attribute to conservation farming practices. The Department of Agriculture and Rural Development credits techniques like installing buffer strips, windbreak trees and tile drainage filter structures at farms for the drop in phosphorus in the River Raisin since 2008.

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Bipartisan push for Great Lakes funding in 2017

Detroit News

Lawmakers from the House – 32 Democrats and 14 Republicans — signed a letter urging President Obama to extend funding for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative into 2017. The Obama administration proposed cutting $50 million from the $300 million fund in 2016. House staffers say funding seems to be on track to be restored for the coming year, but concerns remain for 2017.

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WEF report details future of stormwater issues

Water Technology & Water Environment Federation

The Water Environment Federation released a report about the challenges, opportunities and paths to improve the country's stormwater systems during WEFTEC 2015 in Chicago this week. The release of the document, Rainfall to Results: The Future of Stormwater, coincided with the launch of the WEF Stormwater Institute to address stormwater issues.

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  • Field Notes