Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017

Progress stalls

EPA delays action on lead in drinking water again

A sign above a bathroom sink in Flint, Michigan, from February 6, 2016, instructs people not to drink the water because of high lead levels. The EPA has once again delayed publication of new federal lead rules. Photo J. CARL GANTER

Circle of Blue

Circle of Blue

Even after the Flint scandal reawakened the nation to the dangers posed by lead drinking water pipes, the EPA appears to be in no rush to strengthen federal health standards. Years after Flint declared a state of emergency, the agency is delaying publication of rules that could prevent lead poisoning. The agency now expects a draft rule to limit the risks from lead and copper in water to be published in January 2018 — six months later than the timeline announced a year ago.

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Minn. governor's water meeting draws crowd

The Journal

Despite wet conditions and threatening tornadoes, roughly 200 people showed up at Minnesota State University, Mankato, to discuss goals for improving water quality. Gov. Mark Dayton hosted the second of 10 townhall meetings across the state to discuss his 25 by ’25 water quality goal. Dayton's proposal is to increase water quality in Minnesota by 25 percent by the year 2025.

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Algal blooms cost Ohio homeowners $152 million

Phys.org

In a new study, researchers at The Ohio State University estimate algal blooms at two lakes cost Ohio homeowners $152 million in lost property value over six years. Meanwhile, a related study suggests that algae is driving anglers away from Lake Erie, causing fishing license sales to drop at least 10 percent every time a bloom reaches a moderate level of health risk.

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