Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Questionable results

FDA, CDC warn Flint blood tests may be inaccurate

Flint resident Grant Porter, 5, watches as his mother Ardis Porter, 26, has her blood drawn for lead testing at the Flint Masonic Temple in this 2016 Flint Journal file photo. CONOR RALPH

MLive.com

MLive.com

Tests given to 128 Flint residents may have registered falsely low blood lead levels, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services says. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration announced last week that certain tests from one manufacturer "may provide inaccurate results for some children and adults in the United States." The tests have been in use since 2014, the start of Flint's lead in water crisis.

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Researchers look for benefits in biosolid ash

Star Tribune

Minnesota's Metropolitan Council incinerates the biosolids left behind at the end of the wastewater treatment process converting the waste into heat and power. The end result is a lot of ash, which is usually hauled to a landfill. But recently, researchers instead sprinkled bags of ash on a farm field, in hopes that the phosphorus-rich powder could have a future as fertilizer.

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Wisconsin lawmakers target phosphorus regs

Wisconsin State Journal

A group of lawmakers in Wisconsin are calling for the federal government to help ease regulations of phosphorus discharge into lakes and streams, saying complying with the standards is too expensive for small municipalities. The state was among the first in the nation to adopt specific, measurable standards for how much phosphorus could be released.

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