Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2020

Not if, but when

Could Sacramento flood like New Orleans? It's possible, but water managers are trying to make it less likely

Pumping Station 2 is one of more than 150 in the city. Gravity draws the water into the pump station where it is cleaned of debris. EZRA DAVID ROMERO / Capital Public Radio

Capital Public Radio

Capital Public Radio

Three years ago, water began seeping out of yards and pooling in roadways in the Sacramento Pocket neighborhood. But the water wasn’t from a recent storm. It had come through and under the levees. Weak and problematic levees are a big reason why there was so much destruction when Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in 2005. Could it happen here? Levee experts say yes.

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Weed and water woes in the Emerald Triangle

Environmental Health News

In early September, the run of Supply Creek near Ken Norton's office on the Hoopa Valley Reservation has gone dry. The boulders and logs placed to create salmon and trout habitat lie bare under the sun. Under California's new cannabis regulatory system, 266 marijuana farmers are applying for permits to grow on the Hoopa Valley Tribe's traditional lands, which may lower flows and kill off young fish.

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New class on beach dynamics, changing coastline

UC Irvine

In December 2018, visitors at Dana Point’s Capistrano Beach watched in disbelief as the iconic 250-foot boardwalk collapsed into the ocean – a victim of severe erosion. A new beach dynamics course for UC Irvine graduate students will help engineers understand how beaches are changing and find ways to manage the impacts.

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