Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016

'Ghost claims'

Dead pioneers haunt South Dakota water rights

Rapid City Journal

Rapid City Journal

It’s a safe bet that neither John P. Plunkett nor Edward Lynch will show up to defend their water rights when a state board considers terminating them later this year. That’s because Plunkett and Lynch are dead — and have been for a long time. Yet their joint rights to divert water from Rapid Creek live on, because they obtained the rights in 1896, more than a decade before South Dakota began regulating the use of water.

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Aspen to keep Castle, Maroon reservoir rights

Aspen Daily News

Eliminating the city’s future possibility to build reservoirs that would inundate portions of the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness would be irresponsible, given the uncertainties presented by climate change, Aspen City Council members have decided.

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ASU research finds way to make fracking safer

Science Daily

Injecting wastewater deep underground as a byproduct of oil and gas extraction techniques that include fracking causes human-made earthquakes, new research has found. The study, which also showed that the risk can be mitigated, has the potential to transform oil and gas industry practices.

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