Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016

Bouncing back

25-year, $360 million rescue pays off for sucker fish

Denver Post

Denver Post

For millions of years, razorback sucker fish thrived in a raging, flood-prone Colorado River and were so abundant that settlers caught them on pitchforks and fed them to cows. But over the past 50 years, the razorbacks — yellow-bellied with humped, green heads and frenzied, fleshy lips — fell victim to dams, development and voracious nonnative predators that ate them nearly to extinction. Now they’re making a major turnaround, beneficiaries of a 25-year, $360 million government-run rescue.

READ MORE ►
 

Farmers feel the pressure to fight water pollution

Harvest Public Media

Living in the Platte River Valley in central Nebraska means understanding that the water in your well may contain high levels of nitrates and may not be safe to drink. “When our first son was born in 1980, we actually put a distiller in for our drinking water here in the house,” says Ken Seim, who lives near the town of Chapman. “And at that time our water level was a 12 parts per million.” For Seim, nitrate pollution in groundwater is a problem that feels personal, because he’s a farmer.

READ MORE ►
 

Who will pay for Utah's Lake Powell Pipeline?

Salt Lake Tribune

Taxpayers can expect to foot up to 72 percent of the controversial Lake Powell Pipeline's costs, according to University of Utah economists who analyzed repayment models developed in support of the billion-dollar-plus proposal to pipe Colorado River water 140 miles to St. George.

READ MORE ►
 
  • Field Notes