Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017

Money for water

Colorado River pilot project wins over farmers, ranchers

Freddie Botur walking across rocks that form the diversion structure at his headgate on Cottonwood Creek, a tributary of the Green River. Botur was paid to let water flow past these headgates and down the river system toward Lake Powell. (Jim Paussa)

Aspen Journalism

Aspen Journalism

Three years ago, the four largest municipal water providers in the Colorado River basin, along with the Bureau of Reclamation, launched the System Conservation Pilot Program. The goal: To see how complicated it would be to pay farmers and ranchers to use less water on their fields and instead let the water flow down the rivers to Lake Powell and Lake Mead. The result: It caught on with skeptics, but water officials will halt the program after this year until they work out some challenges. It won't be easy.

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Data: 90% of Utah schools testing water find lead

Salt Lake Tribune & Utah Department of Environmental Quality

At least some level of lead has turned up in the drinking water at nearly 90 percent of the 249 Utah schools that have been tested, according to state data. Most of the drinking-water systems tested contain low levels of the toxic metal, which is known to cause developmental delays in young children. Parents should be aware of lead-tainted water at their child’s school, but not panic, said a top Utah health expert. ► CHECK ALL SCHOOL RESULTS

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Failed CAP-California deal fans Arizona water war

Arizona Daily Star & AZcentral.com

A proposed 2015 sale of Arizona water to California that never happened is now a flash point in a controversy pitting Arizona’s top water agency against the Central Arizona Project (CAP). And it all centers on a 2015 memo from a CAP attorney that some state water officials are calling a “rogue action.” What does this mean for the state's water future?

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