Thursday, July 6, 2017

Water drops

USGS: High Plains aquifer levels continue to decline

The U.S. Geological Survey has released a recent report detailing changes of groundwater levels in the High Plains aquifer. The report presents water-level change data in the aquifer for two separate periods: from 1950—the time prior to significant groundwater irrigation development—to 2015, and from 2013 to 2015. (USGS)

USGS

High Plains Journal & USGS

The U.S. Geological Survey's recent report on groundwater levels in the High Plains aquifer continue to show declines. The report presents water-level change data in the aquifer for two periods: from 1950 (the time prior to significant groundwater irrigation development) to 2015, and from 2013 to 2015. The High Plains aquifer, also known as the Ogallala aquifer, underlies Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas and Wyoming.

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N.M. agency's creative way to protect headwaters

Water Deeply

In June, New Mexico’s largest water authority pledged $1 million over five years to the Rio Grande Water Fund to protect the headwaters that provide drinking water for about half the state’s population. The contribution is remarkable for its size, and for the fact that it is a public utility – the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority – investing in lands it doesn’t own.

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Arizona raises a glass to potable water beer

Arizona Daily Sun

To help promote public education and acceptance, more than 30 Arizona breweries have agreed to brew beer with potable water from the Pure Water Brew truck as part of the AZ Pure Water Brew Challenge. The portable water-treatment system initiative comes at a time when state environmental regulators are nearing completion of interim rules that will allow utilities to treat reclaimed wastewater for drinking water reuse.

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