Thursday, June 1, 2017

Dust bowl?

More Salt Lake water diversion spells trouble for Utah

Wind kicks up dust from the exposed lake bed at the Great Salt Lake Marina on May 12, 2017. (BENJAMIN ZACK/Standard-Examiner)

Standard-Examiner

Standard-Examiner

While much of the future fallout from a desiccated Great Salt Lake remains unclear, one study is showing that air quality will worsen. The lake hit the brink of a record low last year due in part to human water consumption. With a major diversion planned for the lake’s main tributary, the Bear River, many environmental advocates worry the state’s poor air quality will reach disastrous levels.

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New twist in EPA lawsuit against Colorado Springs

Denver Post

Colorado Springs’ years-long challenge with stormwater that has carried controversy downstream to Pueblo County has taken a new turn. U.S. Rep. Doug Lamborn told The Denver Post this week he has spoken twice in recent months with Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt about the legal action and also sent him a letter, emboldened, perhaps, by a new D.C. administration.

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Drying up: Climate change on the Arkansas River

KSUT Ignacio & Water Deeply

The Arkansas River supports economies in Colorado from Leadville to La Junta and beyond. With base industries including tourism and agriculture, southern Colorado depends on the river's yearly flows. But climate researchers expect declines in those flows over time, leaving the Arkansas River and its dependents at risk of facing a future with less water.

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