Thursday, May 19, 2016

On-peak problem

Electricity demand linked to struggles for river wildlife

Deseret News

Deseret News

Morning and evening routines for families across the West — powering up kitchen appliances, taking a shower, turning up the thermostat — may contribute to conditions that make survival difficult for aquatic wildlife downstream from hydroelectric dams. That's the finding of a study co-authored by a Utah State University ecologist and published last week. The crux of the problem lies in a practice called hydropeaking, where dams release more water than normal to produce more energy during peak hours of the day.

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New Colo. law brings rain barrels out from shadows

Colorado Public Radio

Rain barrel owners are passionate advocates who believe the practice is an essential water conservation tool. Rain barrel owners are law breakers who steal water from farmers and other water rights holders. These two long-held identities for many rain barrel owners along the Front Range have now been reconciled through a new Colorado law to be signed by Gov. John Hickenlooper.

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USGS: Fracking can taint fresh water nearby

Washington Post

A recent study by the U.S. Geological Survey appears to have answered one burning question about millions of gallons of water laced with chemicals that bubble out of the ground after being injected into the wells to fracture rocks and release trapped gas. When the water is stored, do the chemicals somehow leach into nearby surface water such as streams? The short answer is yes, said the study's lead author, Denise Akob, a USGS microbiologist.

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