Thursday, Jan. 4, 2018

Big unknowns

What legal marijuana means for water in the West

Sustainable cannabis farmer Dylan Turner applies fertilizer to a crop of plants at Sunboldt Farms, a small family farm run by Sunshine and Eric Johnston in Humboldt County. ROBERT GAUTHIER / Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

Water Deeply & Grand Junction Daily Sentinel

Six western states now allow recreational use of marijuana, creating a huge new legal market for cannabis farmers. But the implications for water supplies remain a big unknown because of the historically illegal nature of the crop. Even now, no state regulators can answer a basic question about marijuana cultivation: How much water will this new industry consume?

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Colorado River drought plan stays elusive, for now

KUNC Greeley & H2O Radio

Drought and population growth are forcing tough negotiations about who gets precious Colorado River water and who must cut back. After two years of intrastate bickering, a comprehensive deal is far off and the future of the Southwest hinges on one measurement: How full is Lake Mead? On the other hand, some are pinning their hopes on cloud seeding to boost the Colorado.

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Texas, N.M. water war heads to Supreme Court

Texas Standard & SCOTUSblog

On Jan. 8, Texas and New Mexico are headed to the Supreme Court to give their oral arguments in a dispute over an 80-year-old compact involving water from the Rio Grande. Texas claims New Mexico hasn’t been handing over the state’s allocated share of water.

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