Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Dramatic decline

Oregon State study: Western snowpacks dwindling fast

Julie Koeberle, a hydrologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service, and Dan Fries, hydrologic technician, measure the natural snowpack at a survey station at the Timberline Lodge on Dec. 29, 2015. TONY HERNANDEZ

The Oregonian

The Oregonian

Snowpacks in the western United States, and the important reserves of water they store, have declined dramatically over the last 100 years, researchers from Oregon State University said. A new study, published in the journal Nature, found that the average western snowpack was down between 15 and 30 percent since 1915, and that decline accounted for a volume of water comparable to that of Lake Mead, the largest manmade reservoir in the west.

READ MORE ►
 

WSU strengthens permeable pavement

Washington State University

A Washington State University research team is solving a high-tech waste problem while addressing the environmental challenge of stormwater runoff. The researchers have shown they can greatly strengthen permeable pavements by adding waste carbon fiber composite material. The researchers are beginning to conduct real-world tests on pavement applications.

READ MORE ►
 

Vancouver puts focus on rainwater management

CBC News

Vancouver is notorious for its heavy rainfall, but the environmental impact of all that water is perhaps not as well known. The city is addressing that general lack of rainwater knowledge during a series of public workshops starting this month. The workshops are part of the Rain City Strategy, which aims to limit the amount of polluted road water runoff going into the ecosystem.

READ MORE ►