Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018

Taking on PFAS

Michigan sets limit for chemical contaminants in water

The Tannery Waste Landfill on House Street where workers from Youngs Environmental Cleanup work in October 2017. Amid growing concern over chemical contaminants in the state’s drinking water, Gov. Rick Snyder’s office on Tuesday adopted a threshold for when regulators can act against polluters. KATY BATDORFF / Special to Detroit News

Katy Batdorff

Detroit News

Amid growing concern over chemical contaminants in Michigan’s drinking water, Gov. Rick Snyder’s office adopted a threshold for when regulators can act against polluters. The new rule will require state remediation if residential or commercial drinking water is found to have per- and polyfluoroalkyl levels that meet or exceed 70 parts per trillion. The substances, known collectively as PFAS, have been found in at least 14 communities across the state.

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Minn. neighborhood could be heated with sewage

Star Tribune

Minnesota’s wastewater may soon become a hot commodity — literally. Planners designing a sustainable mini-neighborhood near TCF Bank Stadium in Minneapolis want to heat buildings there with sewage flowing deep beneath the streets. It would be one of the largest applications of a burgeoning technology that draws energy from wastewater.

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Iowa flood sensors wade into artificial intelligence

GovTech.com

Homeowners in Iowa worried about the possibility of flooding will soon be able to just ask Alexa. The move to merge flood sensor data with artificially intelligent chatbots marks the next generation of flood data analysis available all across Iowa. The project is being led by the Iowa Flood Center, based at the University of Iowa, which has a long history of studying the effects of rainfall and flooding.

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