Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015

Buried urban rivers

Potential danger to water quality just now surfacing

CityLab

CityLab

Sunfish Creek once ran from where Times Square is today, coursing across 7th Avenue, feeding a pond at 32nd Street and 4th Avenue before spilling into the East River. No trace of it exists today. It was paved over in the 19th century to make way for new development, or to contain flooding and disease. Now, it’s just one of hundreds of the city’s waterways that were erased at that time but are creating new problems now.

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Georgia farming industry: Guarding every drop

Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Florida’s latest “water wars” lawsuit against Georgia currently before the U.S. Supreme Court takes direct legal aim — for the first time — at the region’s farmers who collectively use more water than metro Atlanta. Under attack, though, Georgia’s row-crop farmers are embracing technology to better shepherd the most precious of commodities — water.

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Amid drought, think tanks warn of U.S. eco-deficit

Water Online

The U.S. fiscal deficit gets voters riled up all over the country. Can an "ecological deficit" do the same? The nation reached a milestone last month: It hit an ecological deficit, according to a new paper by a pair of think tanks. Water scarcity, drought, and rapid use of water resources are chief parts of the problem.

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