Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2016

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Clean air may be driving water quality in Chesapeake

Phys.org

Phys.org

A new study suggests that improvements in air quality over the Potomac watershed, including the Washington, D.C., metro area, may be responsible for recent progress on water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. Scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science have linked improving water quality in streams and rivers of the Upper Potomac River Basin to reductions in nitrogen pollution onto the land and streams due to enforcement of the Clean Air Act.

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MIT sends robots into sewers to monitor waste

Quartz

Beneath the streets of Boston, two robots named Mario and Luigi inspect the flow of human waste, collecting data on city residents. The robots are part of the new MIT Underworlds project, which mines urban sewage for information about human health and behavior — a previously untapped resource that could shape the future of epidemiology, say researchers.

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Damaged watersheds linked to treatment costs

Washington Post

The human footprint on the environment may have affected one of the Earth's most precious resources — our drinking water — in a major way throughout the last century, according to new research that suggests that population growth and land use changes since 1900 have increased pollution in urban watersheds and driven up the cost of water treatment in the process.

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