Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Hotbed for lead

Investigation: Buffalo, N.Y., 8 times worse than Flint

A Reuters investigation found at least four Buffalo, N.Y., zip codes here where 40 percent of children tested from 2006 to 2014 had high lead levels, making Buffalo among the most dangerous lead hotspots in America. (Flickr / Scott Kinmartin)

Flickr

Reuters

A Reuters investigation found at least four Buffalo, N.Y., ZIP codes where 40 percent of children tested from 2006 to 2014 had high lead levels, making Buffalo among the most dangerous lead hotspots in America. The rate of high lead tests in these areas was far worse – eight times greater – than that found among children across Flint, Michigan, during that city’s recent water crisis.

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Google raises stakes in S.C. 'water wars'

Mashable

Endless emails, map requests, web searches, and everything else we do online requires the use of energy-hungry, water-guzzling data centers. For Google, that enormous thirst for water is causing controversy near Charleston, S.C., where the tech giant hosts a sprawling data center complex.

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It doesn't have to rain to flood this Georgia island

Yale Climate Connections

Sapelo Island researchers are expecting the sea to rise along Georgia’s coast at least 6 inches in the next 50 years. Sapelo is already feeling the impact with an increase in a phenomenon called "blue sky" flooding. Unlike flooding associated with downpours, this flooding comes as a result of really high tides.

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