Monday, Oct. 19, 2015

Stormy outlook

Mudslides offer a preview of what El Niño could bring

How debris flows happen. LOS ANGELES TIMES

Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

The storm that slammed into the high desert and mountains of Southern California last week was one for the record books. Intense rain sent massive mudflows onto highways. Hundreds of vehicles were trapped in mud up to 20 feet deep; in some cases, motorists were stranded overnight. The storm was not related to El Niño, but one meteorologist said these weather events offer a preview of what's to come.

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Waiting game begins for drought-parched Valley

Los Angeles Times

There is still a chance of wildfires and autumn heat waves, and the calls to conserve will not soon abate. But this is a season for hope, if not anticipation, that the months ahead might at last bring the snow and rain needed to start releasing the state from the clutches of a four-year drought.

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The race to build wetlands in San Francisco Bay

San Jose Mercury News

San Francisco Bay is in a race against time, with billions of dollars of highways, airports, homes and office buildings at risk from rising seas, surging tides and extreme storms driven by climate change. And to knock down the waves and reduce flooding, 54,000 acres of wetlands — an area twice the size of the city of San Francisco — need to be restored around the bay in the next 15 years.

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  • Field Notes