Friday, Aug. 18, 2017

Delta hiccup

With crucial vote nearing, twin tunnels project struggles to win over ag groups. Here's why some are hesitating

The federal Bureau of Reclamation's pumping station near Tracy delivers water to the San Joaquin Valley. Contractors of the federal Central Valley Project and State Water Project will decide in September whether to pay for the twin tunnels. SACRAMENTO BEE

Sacramento Bee

Sacramento Bee

As water agencies prepare to vote next month on paying for the Delta tunnels, the stark difference between urban and rural water users' costs illustrates one of the plan's main stumbling blocks. Although the project is moving through the permit process, it can't break ground unless a solid bloc of south-of-Delta water agencies, urban and rural alike, commits to paying the $17 billion tab.

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Avalanche of lawsuits filed against Delta tunnels

Publication

Seeking to freeze a contentious $16 billion waterworks plan supported by Gov. Brown, Sacramento County sued Thursday over the certification of the Delta tunnels project's "dizzying" and "shifting" environmental review. The county alleges that the plan will harm endangered fish species and Delta farmers, and disproportionately impact low-income communities.

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Efforts to keep Lake Tahoe's clarity are paying off

South Tahoe Now

Hard work by local governments to reduce urban stormwater pollution and restore the famous clarity of Lake Tahoe is paying off. Fine sediment entering Lake Tahoe has been reduced by 12 percent, beating the first round of five-year pollutant reduction targets to reduce TMDL by 2 percent, according to the latest report.

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