Thursday, Feb. 22, 2018

Storage push

Legislators demand that California Water Commission speed up spending billions on new state reservoirs

Republican Assembly Leader Brian Dahle, with a toy wagon full of petitions, prepares to speak at California Water Commission hearing on funding for new reservoirs and dams. DALE KASLER / Sacramento Bee

Sacramento Bee

Sacramento Bee

With California facing another potential drought, state legislators demanded Wednesday that the California Water Commission release $2.7 billion in bond funding for dams, reservoirs and other water storage projects. In January, CWC staff issued a preliminary determination that the 11 projects under consideration aren’t eligible for nearly as much funding as they’d like. Lawmakers and others accused the commission of effectively thwarting the will of the voters.

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Water users, cut off during drought, win in court

Stockton Record

Thousands of water-right holders who were told to cease diversions during the last drought were deprived of due process, a judge found Wednesday, raising questions about how the state will handle future shortages. The judge ruled that the water users, including some mostly agricultural districts in the Delta, were not afforded “certain minimal protections” like formal hearings in which they could challenge the state’s claim that enough water wasn't available.

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Rising sea levels put Pacific salt marshes at risk

KQED San Francisco, Los Angeles Times & UCLA Newsroom

The prognosis for California’s coastal wetlands is not good — and that has broad implications for the state’s resilience against the impacts of climate change. A new study from the U.S. Geological Survey and UCLA indicates that by the end of the century coastal marshlands in the Golden State could effectively be gone as a result of rising seas.

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